Where compressor in pedal chain

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In a guitar pedal chain, a compressor pedal is typically placed near the beginning of the chain, before other effects such as distortion, overdrive, and delay pedals. This is because a compressor pedal is used to shape and control the dynamic range of the guitar signal, and it is best to do this before the signal is affected by other pedals.

The compressor pedal works by reducing the dynamic range of the guitar signal, which means it reduces the difference in volume between the loudest and quietest parts of the signal. This can be useful for smoothing out uneven playing or for adding sustain to the guitar sound.

The placement of the compressor pedal in the chain can affect how the other pedals interact with the guitar signal. For example, if the compressor pedal is placed after a distortion or overdrive pedal, it may not be able to effectively reduce the dynamic range of the signal.

It’s important to experiment with the placement of the compressor pedal in your pedal chain to find the best sound for your setup. Some players prefer to have the compressor pedal at the beginning of the chain, while others prefer to place it after other effects.

Should compressor go before or after overdrive?

The placement of a compressor pedal in relation to an overdrive pedal in a guitar pedal chain can affect the overall sound and tone of the guitar.

If the compressor pedal is placed before the overdrive pedal, it will compress the guitar signal before it is distorted by the overdrive pedal. This can result in a more consistent, even tone, as well as a more defined attack and sustain for the notes played.

On the other hand, if the compressor pedal is placed after the overdrive pedal, it will compress the already distorted signal. This can result in a more compressed, saturated tone, with less definition and attack. It can also cause the notes to sound less dynamic, and the overall effect may be less pronounced.

It’s important to experiment with the placement of the compressor pedal in relation to the overdrive pedal to find the best sound for your setup. Some players prefer to have the compressor pedal before the overdrive pedal to have a more defined tone and sustain, while others prefer to have it after the overdrive pedal to add more saturation and sustain to the sound.

What order should I put my pedals in?

The order in which you place your guitar pedals can greatly affect the overall sound and tone of your guitar. The general rule of thumb is to place pedals that affect the overall tone of your guitar, such as distortion, overdrive, and EQ pedals, before pedals that affect the modulation of the tone, such as delay, reverb, and chorus pedals.

Here is a suggested order of pedals you might want to consider:

  1. Dynamics pedals (compressor, noise gate): These pedals are used to shape and control the dynamic range of your guitar signal. They are best placed at the beginning of the pedal chain to affect the raw guitar signal.
  2. Filtering pedals (wah, envelope filter): These pedals are used to shape the frequency response of your guitar signal. They are best placed after dynamics pedals but before distortion and overdrive pedals.
  3. Distortion, overdrive and boost pedals: These pedals are used to add gain and saturation to your guitar signal. They are best placed after filtering pedals.
  4. Modulation pedals (chorus, flanger, phaser): These pedals are used to add movement and depth to your guitar signal. They are best placed after distortion and overdrive pedals.
  5. Time-based pedals (delay, reverb): These pedals are used to add ambiance and space to your guitar signal. They are best placed after modulation pedals.

Keep in mind that the order of pedals is a personal preference, and you should experiment with different combinations to find the best sound for your setup.

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